LMU's Communication Studies Department provides students with the communication competencies to pursue their personal, professional, and civic goals. Our department fosters the development of the whole person, promotes a commitment to social justice and cultural diversity, and confronts the most pressing contemporary political, social, and ethical issues of our time. To this end, we prepare students to communicate effectively in the service of human dignity and rights, civic engagement, and global equity.

CMST Schedule - Fall 2017 Semester

View a full list of Communication Studies courses.

  • CMST 1600 - Nature of Theory

    This course introduces students to the field of communication studies. Students will study the field’s disciplinary history, the nature of theory, and foundational concepts from multiple sub-fields within the discipline.  

  • CMST 1700 - Nature of Inquiry

    This course overviews the research process, with an emphasis on the foundational skills necessary to conduct original research, including: generating research questions, developing scholarly arguments, locating, retrieving and evaluating sources, and actual data collection methods. Students will also be introduced to basic aspects of writing for the discipline, as well as expectations for scholarly ethics and proper citation of sources.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Majors only.

    Pre-req: CMST 1600.

  • CMST 2100 - Relational Communication

    This course is designed to introduce the students to interpersonal and small group communication theories, processes, and skills. The course challenges students to examine their own communication behaviors and focus on their strengths and weaknesses as a way to develop and apply new communication skills and proficiencies. The course includes a variety of oral and written presentations at both the individual and group levels.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Majors only.

    Pre-req: CMST 1600 and CMST 1700.

    Flag: Quantitative Reasoning.

  • CMST 2200 - Intercultural Communication

    A study of the principles and theories of human communication related to cross cultural encounters. This course emphasizes understanding the relationship between persons and culture and for improving communication between persons from different cultural backgrounds.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Majors only.

    Pre-req: CMST 1600 and CMST 1700.

  • CMST 2300 - Organizational Communication

    This course is designed to introduce the students to the field of organizational communication and the relationship between organization and communication. The course is designed to allow students to examine a range of organizational communication perspectives, theories, issues, and constructs. At the same time, students are encouraged to explore the ways these perspectives shape, expand, and limit our understanding of communication and organizing. Significantly, the course encourages critical and analytical thinking by using the course content as a basis for critique.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Majors only.

    Pre-req: CMST 1600 and CMST 1700.

    Flag: Quantitative Reasoning.

  • CMST 2400 - Contemporary Rhetorical Theory

    This course provides a survey of major rhetorical themes and theories, including classical, symbolic, argumentation, critical, feminist, and non-Western approaches to rhetoric. Students will explore the relationship between rhetorical theory and practice, the contributions of rhetorical theory to the social world, and the potential for rhetorical studies to inform issues of democratic governance, marginalized groups, social justice, and technology in society.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Majors only.

    Pre-req: CMST 1600 and CMST 1700.

  • CMST 2500 - Media Studies

    This course introduces students to three key areas in the field of media and communication: 1) media industries, circulation and the political economy of media; 2) the legacy of British Cultural Studies in exploring identity, resistance and the active audience; 3) media effects, including quantitative audience reception studies and ethnographic approaches to audience analysis. Students will be encouraged to directly engage with the political, social, cultural and economic influence of evolving technologies and mediums in our digitally mediated global environments.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Majors only.

    Pre-req: CMST 1600 and CMST 1700.

    Flag: Quantitative Reasoning

  • CMST 2800 - Advanced Public Communication

    This course provides advanced training in argumentation skills, including logical reasoning, the use of evidence, and effective organization of content.  Students will conduct topical research and prepare oral and written arguments.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Majors only.

    Pre-req: CMST 1600 and CMST 1700.

    Flag: Oral Skills and Information Literacy.

  • CMST 3XXX - Advanced Topic Courses

    Advanced Topic courses are advanced courses in which students "apply" communication concepts, theories and research methods to address "real world" issues/problems in concrete contexts. They range in subject matter and conceptual content, yet remain consistent with our departmental mission in social justice, requiring students to apply their knowledge for the purpose of sustaining a more humane and livable world. Advanced Topic courses are creative and/or theoretical in focus in the critique and/or production of persuasive messages (in oral, written, visual, or electronic form) adapted to target audiences to accomplish ethical and effective change.

    Students learn to analyze communication messages, understand the relationship between communication, audience, and context, and demonstrate a commitment to cultivating critical thinking skills about the complex role of communication in society locally and globally. Advanced Topic courses may also offer student opportunities to develop their group and community-oriented communication skills by working in teams or partnering with organizations on and/or off-campus in service learning contexts or internships. Advanced Topic courses vary semester to semester. Please check the current semester schedule to see if a particular course is being offered.

    Any of the 4 courses below will also meet the graduation requirement:

    CMST 3110 Gender Communication: This course provides an examination of the communication styles of males and females in a variety of settings. Course surveys gender similarities and differences in verbal and nonverbal communication with an emphasis on how males and females perceive the world and how these perceptions affect the human communication process. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3120 Family Communication: This course examines aspects of interpersonal and relational communication within the context of the family system. Topics including family identity and the creation of shared family meanings, family intimacy, family roles, and family power dynamics, managing family conflict and family stress, and intergenerational family relationships are investigated through the lens of the family communication system. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2100, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3130: Pro-Social Communication: This course will identify pro-social behavior and communication, contrast it with anti-social norms, and focus on the values inherent in the caring, sharing, and ways of building relationships and communities with an emphasis on the possibilities for both individual and collective growth and well-being. Emphasis will be on the understanding of both individual and group behaviors that promote effective and cooperative pro-social communication. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2100 and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3140: Spiritualism & Loving Relationships: In this course, students will learn the complicated dimensions of communication in loving relationships from a spiritual perspective. Exploring the nature of communication in any kind of loving relationship from a spiritual perspective, whether with parents and children, between siblings, or between romantic partners, will help bring about spiritual enrichment and transformation in our relationships with our family friends and lovers. The aim of this course is to explore ways to become better communicators by being grounded in spiritualism. Major Only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3150: Persuasion: This course will provide an overview of basic social-scientific theories of persuasion. Then, the course examines how these social-scientific approaches differ from and complement other approaches to understanding the practice of persuasion. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800

    Flag: Oral Skills

    Flag: Engaged Learning

    CMST 3160: Performance Culture & Sexualities: This course will examine the many ways in which performance exists and operates in our culture with a focus on personal narrative, ethnographic fieldwork and literature. In addition there will be a focus on deconstructing sex, gender, sexuality as rich sites of theoretical interpretation and performative interaction. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3170: Mindful Living, Mindful Communication: Current technology allows us to connect with just about anybody with a touch of the finger; however, we often find ourselves unable to engage in genuine, one-on-one communication, which can be characterized as being "mindful." On the one hand, technology has made us more efficient and productive, but, on the other hand, we find our attention to be scattered and our lives marked by stress and complications. Specifically, in this course there are two overarching goals: (1) Students will learn to cultivate mindfulness to become more in tune with what they see, touch, hear, feel, and think, and (2) they will learn how to communicate mindfully by showing respect, compassion, and loving kindness in their relationships. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3180: Leadership & Interpersonal Communication: In this course we will explore a wide range of human behavior as it relates to leadership development and communication with an emphasis on global communication issues. Students will learn about leadership, strengthen leadership skills, and learn to value their potential for leadership. This course will integrate theory and practice to build leadership competencies required in today's global workplace. This course is largely experiential and guided by the principle that leadership is a skill that can be developed and refined. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2100 or CMST 2300.

    CMST 3190: Advanced Topics in Interpersonal Communication: Seminar addressing selected, advanced topics in interpersonal communication. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2100 and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3191: Relationships in Context: This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of human relationships, with a particular focus on the sociocultural approach to relating and communicating. This course is based on the premise that relationships are far more than the matching of personalities or the forming of emotional bonds. Rather, our relational experiences are situated within and shaped by larger historical, social, cultural, technological, and political contexts. Through readings, lectures, class discussions, and film analyses, students will explore social rules in relational conduct, the cultural codes of love and romance, the material/technological circumstances of relating, and the politics of private life. This course is also designed to encourage students to rethink some popular assumptions that inform our understanding of interpersonal communication, such as the false binary of public/private, the illusion of relationships as containers, and the centrality of individualism and cognition. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2100, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3290: Advanced Topics in Intercultural Communication: Seminar addressing selected, advanced topics in intercultural communication. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, 1700, 2800, and 2200.

    CMST 3310 Media & Marketing Communication: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to integrated marketing communications, media selection and campaign execution. Students will learn the elements of a successful strategic communications plan by evaluating advertising, public relations and marketing silos and their impact on motivating target audiences. In this course, students will learn to evaluate audience demographics and apply appropriate communication channels and messages based upon audience needs and the business realities of marketing campaigns. A key course objective is to gain an understanding of how to propose and implement an integrated marketing communications plan from the viewpoints of advertising agencies, businesses and nonprofit entities. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3320: Sexualities & Organizational Communication: This course develops and facilitates learners' critical knowledge of the intersections between sexualities, organizations, and communication. Over the course of the semester, we will build a queer understanding of sexuality and organizational communication that is guided by the question, "what would it mean to embody a sexual ethics of organizing?" Building upon theoretical approaches to organizational communication, this course lays an anti-foundational understanding of sexuality, or rather we will come to know sexualities as strange, plural achievements that are lived and embodied within a contested terrain of history, culture, power, and labor. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and CMST 2300.

    Flag: Integration Interdisciplinary Connections

    Flag: Information Literacy

    CMST 3325: Communication & Healthcare: Communication plays a critically important role in many different aspects of the healthcare process from care delivery to public health campaigns. This course offers a broad survey of health communication theory, research, and practice focused on patient-provider interaction, communication in healthcare organizations, culture and health, health education, and social marketing. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2100 or CMST 2300.

    CMST 3330: Corporate Ethics & Social Responsibility: Students in this course will review and exhibit comprehension of theories and practical application of corporate ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, 1700, 2800, and CMST 2300.

    CMST 3335: Sport & Public Communication: This course will explore the interplay between the business, socioeconomic, and cultural dynamics of sport and how these intersections are influenced by the aspect of public communication. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3340: Communication & Work Life Balance: This course examines the paradox of work-life balance in the lives of workers who are parents, adult caregivers of aging parents, spouses, significant others, and friends who juggle work and their personal lives. With the boundaries between work and home becoming more and more permeable, work and personal relationships and responsibilities become more complex. In this course we examine the discourses of work-life management in regards to everyday practices as well as organizational policies—the relational level and the organizational level. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3350: Nonprofit Communication Campaigns: This class is a Community Based Learning (CBL) course and requires completion of volunteer hours with a nonprofit organization. Students will work in teams to design and write communication campaign items for a nonprofit organization. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2300, and CMST 2800.

    Flag: Engaged Learning

    CMST 3370: Gender & the Workplace: This class will explore basic theories and principles of communication and gender in organizational contexts through lectures, class discussions, case studies, assigned readings, films, and written assignments. Students will develop an understanding of gender issues at work and how we construct gendered stereotypes, policies, and values. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, 1700, 2300, and 2800.

    CMST 3380: Communication and Consulting: In this course, students will actively explore the roles and responsibilities of consultants alongside two experienced teachers who will provide feedback and support for these focused experiments. Students will be introduced to common elements of consulting interventions and will apply these elements in case studies that will be engaged first as an entire class and later in small groups of students who have assigned individual responsibilities in managing the cases on which they are working. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2300, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3410 Political Communication: The act of deliberation is the act of reflecting carefully on a matter weighing the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions to a problem. It aims to arrive at a decision or judgment based not only on facts and data but also on values, emotions, and other less technical considerations. This course takes a unique approach to the field of political communication by viewing key concepts and research through the lens of deliberative democracy theory. This course focuses on how communication is central to democratic self-governance primarily because of its potential to facilitate public deliberation. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2400 or CMST 2500.

    CMST 3420: Rhetoric of Women: This course provides the opportunity to explore and analyze rhetorical texts created by women in a variety of contexts and for a range of purposes. The overall goal of the course is to examine the ways in which women develop and use rhetoric to function in, challenge, and change the world. Various texts including writing, speaking, visual and performing arts, as well as media forms will be sued to understand rhetorical situations, concerns and goals of women. Students will gain an understanding of feminist perspectives on communication as a foundation for critically questioning, evaluating and re-envision the nature of communication in our socially constructed world. In this course, gender is viewed as a lens, platform, and position that significantly affects and can radically transform our personal, local, and global lives. Particular attention will be given to the ways in which gender and gender issues intersect with race, class, and sexuality. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3430: Culture, Crime & Punishment: This course examines cultural constructions of crime and punishment. Although the course focuses primarily on the U.S. criminal justice system, we will attend to the prison industrial complex's global reach. Consequently, the course gives students the opportunity to examine one of the most pressing social issues of our time. We will focus our study of cultural constructions of crime and punishment in three different rhetorical cultures: public discourse, prisoners' discourse, and prison activism discourse. These three arenas map onto the three units of the course: 1) Crime and Punishment in the Cultural Imagination; 2) Crime and Punishment in the Prisoners' Imagination, and 3) From Criminal Justice to Transformative Justice. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2400 or CMST 2500.

    Flag: Interdisciplinary Connections.

    CMST 3440: Media Criticism: Seminar emphasizing the critical analysis of contemporary media texts. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2400 or CMST 2500.

    CMST 3450: Rhetoric of Social Movements: The purpose of this course is to facilitate a critical and practical awareness of rhetoric's relationship to social change. As such, this class is both theoretical and practical. This class will analyze individual and group rhetorical strategies and tactics, and consider the utility of these strategies in relation to groups that are attempting to create social change. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2400.

    Flag: Engaged Learning

    CMST 3455: Public Advocacy & Activism: This course will fuse theory and practice through the lenses of public policy and activism/advocacy. Students will refine their persuasive speaking/writing skills; put theory into practice via hands-on fieldwork; hone leadership/motivational abilities; be inspired by the rich history of student-led activism and resistance; research and develop communication strategies for (re)framing of issues; and empower themselves to work for a better tomorrow for all. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3460: Gender, Sexuality and the Media: This course explores ways in which mass media help form, reproduce, and challenge our understanding of gender and sexuality. As a culture saturated with media institutions, we cannot remain untouched by their reach, and consequently, their ideas about what it means to be masculine, feminine, transgendered, racially marked, heterosexual, bisexual, lesbian, gay, queer, or sexually fluid. The course explores how gender and sexuality become characterized through mass media, and what makes possible the disruption of certain constructions of gender or sexuality. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2500, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3470: Primetime Crime: This course is a media criticism course focused on the genre of television crime programs. It explores various sub-genres including the detective story, forensic scientists show, the cop show, and the mafia story. It also explores the transnational circulation of this genre in American, European and Australian contexts. As we explore this genre historically from early radio programs to digital platforms like Netflix, we will consider changes in the television landscape that impact both our TV consumption and the place of crime stories in our lives. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and CMST 2500.

    CMST 3480: Visual Communication: This course helps students cultivate visual literacy in order to better navigate a world of increasing visuality. By adopting a rhetorical perspective toward visual communication, the course examines images designed to persuade and constitute audiences. In the process we will explore the role of visual communication in shaping public opinion, cultural values, and laws. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and CMST 2400.

    CMST 3510: Wires and Empires: In this course, students will first be introduced to key international communication theories and will then be asked to consider whether the introduction of Web 2.0, inexpensive mobile technology and other recent digital media advances are reinforcing or disrupting existing patterns of globalization. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, 1700, 2800 and 2500.

    CMST 3520: Digital Self: Our central question in this course will be: what's the nature of online identity? In this class, we'll explore that question through examining: theoretical approaches to self and society; arguments for and against technological determinism; technology's contested impact on civic engagement and community; and, the profound influence of digital marketing and digital marketing research tools on consumers-as-brands. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800.

    CMST 3530: Digital Rhetoric: This course focuses on analyzing how technologies alter audience, author, text, rhetorical strategies, message and channels of communication. Students will become better versed in criticism and consumption of digital texts and media. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2400 or CMST 2500.

    CMST 3540: Environmental Communication: Seminar focusing on issues of environmental conservation and justice from a communication studies perspective. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2400 or CMST 2500.

    CMST 3590: Advanced Topics in Media Studies: Seminar addressing selected, advanced topics in media studies. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, 1700, 2800, and 2500.

    CMST 3630: For the Love of the Game: This class will explore the intersections of sport, gender and culture. The class will focus on legislation (such as title IX) as well as the rules, norms, rites and rituals that surround sports in our society. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3660: Making Social Worlds: How one acts during 'critical moments' can change the world." This course is designed to help you apply everything that you have learned and will earn about human communication. A particular focus of this course will be on the Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM). We will explore how this theory can be used to improve communication in a wide variety of contexts, from interpersonal relationships, to workplace communication, to public dialogue and political discourse. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800, and either CMST 2100 or CMST 2300.

    CMST 3670: Communication Theory & Popular Culture: In this course students investigate how different cultural forms communicate ideas about the world and about ourselves. We will begin by grounding ourselves in communication and rhetorical theory so that we have lenses through which to analyze texts. We will then discover what makes something popular culture, how various forms of pop culture shape and represent 'reality' and social life, why we consume popular culture in the way that we do, and how we will create, 'play with' and participate in, a popular culture event ourselves. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3671: Comix & the Graphic Novel: Students read graphic novels dealing with themes such as love, mystery, illness, death). Students critique graphic novels and write the critique as a comic book (with endnotes) in which the student interacts with the character(s) from the graphic novels chosen. You will tell a story that use words and images. Students propose and plan a story, shoot photographs, and then produce the comix using Comic Life 3 technology. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800. Consent of instructor required.

    CMST 3710: Community Based Learning: Traditionally, community-based learning and service are distinct from courses of political action and social change. This course focuses on how hands-on community-based learning experiences and skills can act as a vehicle for just social change. Consequently, after the completion of this course, students will have garnered an understanding of the significant relationship between community-based learning, non-profit organizations, and social change. Students will gain hands-on experience in helping organizations create change from a social justice perspective. In so doing, students will gain Communication Studies theoretical and practical knowledge in the non-profit sector from community-based learning and social change perspectives. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, CMST 2800. Consent of instructor required.

    CMST 3810: Advanced Forensics: This is an advanced course in argumentation and debate in which students apply communication concepts, theories and research methods to address "real world" issues and problems in concrete contexts. In this course, successful students will be expected to analyze and adapt their messages based on specific audiences and contexts, capitalizing on their understanding of the complex and dynamic relationships between communicators, their messages, and their audiences in contexts which are challenging and time-bound. Students will be engaged in study of contemporary social, political, economic, and cultural issues. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 2800. Consent of instructor required.

    CMST 3820 Communication Practicum: Communication Practicum is a CMST application class that provides students with an opportunity to gain practical experience in a communication related field in preparation for obtaining a position after graduation. This course provides an opportunity for directed experiences in applying the principles and skills of communication theory while performing specific tasks in the workplace. Students will be able to continue to explore and develop career interests and talents while participating in the internship setting, experience networking, and learn transferable workplace skills. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    Flag: Engaged Learning

    Flag: Oral Skills

    CMST 3830 Communication & Legal Practice: This course brings the legal trial to the classroom, providing students an opportunity to incorporate an array of communication principles and skills with the experience of trial practice. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3840: Mediation & Communication: Mediation is a process that depends on a great deal of communication savvy; whether you are participating as the mediator, a lawyer, or as a client, understanding the communication principles that are at work in the give-and-take of mediation can help you achieve more satisfying results. In this class we will focus on principles of negotiation, based on a communicative understanding of conflict, persuasion, and situation analysis. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    CMST 3860: Entertainment Management & Communication: This course focuses on the traditional organizational "models" in order to describe various structures and the functions of typical executives/managers within their organizations and within the industry. In addition, the course examines digital media and how these media intersect with traditional models. Major only. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    **CMST 3998: Special Studies: Popular Culture & the Law: This course will examine the relationship between varying forms of modern and historical media, and American Jurisprudence. We will explore the depiction and role of lawyers, jurors and litigants, as well differing genders, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the law. Students will study texts, film and other productions, and participate in interactive lectures and written analysis of ethical issues, the legal process and social justice. 1 to 4 semester hours. Major/Non-major. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    **CMST 3998: Special Studies: Victim and Perpetrator Communication: Victim and Perpetrator Communication within the Context of a Peaceful Transition to Power-The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The course will look at the use of victim and perpetrator communications to promote forgiveness and healing within a peaceful transition to power from White minority rule to Black Majority Rule. -The course will focus on whether a truth and reconciliation commission and the concept of amnesty can allow the victim and community to heal and reach closure. We will look at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) within South Africa, Argentina and the Nuremburg Trials. The course will consist of readings from South Africa's TRC, Argentina's TRC, and articles selected and placed in a reader. We will have extensive role-play, view film and have guest lecturers. 1-4 semester hours. Major/Non-major. Jr./Sr. standing. Pre-req: CMST 1600, CMST 1700, and CMST 2800.

    **May count as Elective

  • CMST 4450 - Rhetoric Capstone

    This capstone course examines various ways rhetorical theories may be applied to discourse in order to highlight methods of rhetorical criticism. Requires substantial original textual analysis.

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Major only.

    Jr./Sr. standing.

    Pre-req: CMST 2400 and one course in the 3400-3495 range.

    Flag: Writing.

  • CMST 4750 - Qualitative Methods Capstone

    This capstone requires students to use advanced qualitative research methods and appropriate communication theories to examine a human communication phenomenon within a particular social context.  

    Must be completed with a C or better.

    Major only.

    Jr./Sr. standing.

    Pre-req: CMST 2100, CMST 2200, or CMST 2300, and one course in the CMST 3100-3195, CMST 3200-3295, or CMST 3300-3395 range.

    Flag: Writing.