• This course reviews the art therapy literature and explores the integration of this modality in the current delivery of mental health services, focusing on cultural issues, marital and family theory and recovery-oriented care.

  • This course provides opportunity for the exploration of art materials in support of the students' sensitivity, flexibility and personal presence as art psychotherapists

  • This course provides an introduction to systems theory as a foundation to therapeutic intervention in marital and family therapy. The groundwork provides the conceptual view for the exploration of theoretical perspectives in the family therapy literature. A variety of family structures including traditional and non-traditional forms are studied as well as their clinical implications for the marital and family therapist.

  • This course critically reviews child development theories, introduces models of psychotherapy with children and discusses issues of culture in preparing for work with children. It includes an in-depth community based learning project that facilitates increased awareness of the impact of poverty on the lives of children.

  • Continuation of MFTH 604. Within a family context, this course coordinates normal adolescent development, psychopathology and techniques of psychotherapy. It includes an in-depth community based learning project that facilitates increased awareness of adolescents marginalized by poverty and incarceration.

  • Within a conceptual framework of systems theory in marital and family treatment, major theories are surveyed including psychodynamic, structural, strategic, communications, experiential and post-modern. To demonstrate these theories, videotape of live supervision of cases is utilized where possible. Verbal and nonverbal treatment approaches are explored.

  • This course introduces the network of mental health services in Los Angeles County and principles of mental health recovery-oriented care, including case management, treatment plans, referral procedures, communication and coordination skills, documentation and the systems of care for the severely mentally ill and victims of abuse. It explores the social and psychological implications of socio-economic position, the impact of poverty, culture, sexual orientation, gender, age, language, and immigration status on the delivery of mental health services and the consumer's recovery. Additionally, it identifies professional responsibilities and mandated reporting requirements and introduces consumer and family member perspectives on the experience of mental illness, treatment, and recovery.

  • Normal adult development and theories of dysfunction are presented. Family, marital, individual, and group treatment strategies are addressed exploring both verbal and nonverbal treatment interventions. Emphasis is placed on the differential approach between psychiatric hospital, day treatment, and out-patient settings.

  • This course helps students learn to recognize, assess and treat substance abuse and addiction. It respects the complexity of the subject matter's physiological, sociological, psychological, economic, political and international facets.

  • This course reviews various models of psychotherapy through didactic and experiential methods. It includes effective approaches to communications as well as resolution of problematic issues in the treatment process. Considerations of culture, socioeconomics and stress are addressed and effective practice strategies are emphasized.

  • This course reviews the phenomenon of domestic violence, looking at distinguishing criteria, types, prevalence, lethality, the theory and dynamics of its causes, risk factors, patterns, escalation and cultural factors. It supports students' abilities to recognize and assess the signs and patterns of domestic violence.

  • This course reviews the theory and practice of group psychotherapy. It emphasizes the link between cultural diversity, group process and group outcomes. Particular attention is paid to the utilization of groups in work with the severely mentally ill, children and adolescents as well as mental health consumers and their family members.

  • This course explores human sexuality from a bio-psychosocial perspective, including the effects of physiology, genetics, environmental, individual and relationship problems on sexuality and to know how to address these problems therapeutically. It emphasizes understanding

  • The main objective of this course is supervised application of marital and family theory and psychotherapeutic techniques, including the application of art therapy, in field placement. Students will have opportunities to work with clients and consumers in the community mental health system and demonstrate a beginning understanding of systemic dynamics, applied art therapy interventions and marital and family therapy theory applications. Practicum sites have been specifically selected so students will encounter racial, cultural, linguistic, ethnic and socioeconomic diversity.  Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for enrollment in MFTH 618.

  • The main objective of this course is continued supervised application of marital and family theory and psychotherapeutic techniques, including the application of art therapy, in field placement. Students will continue to have opportunities to work with clients and consumers in the community mental health system and demonstrate a developing understanding of systemic dynamics, applied art therapy interventions, and marriage and family therapy theory applications. Practicum sites have been specifically selected so students will encounter racial, cultural, linguistic, ethnic and socioeconomic diversity.  Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for enrollment in MFTH 619. 

  • The main objective of this course is continued supervised application of marital and family theory and psychotherapeutic techniques, including the application of art therapy, in field placement. Students will have opportunities to work with clients and consumers in the community mental health system and demonstrate a professional understanding of systemic dynamics, applied art therapy interventions, and marital and family therapy theory applications. Practicum sites have been specifically selected so students will encounter racial, cultural, linguistic, ethnic and socioeconomic diversity.

  • An exploration of cultural issues including art-based processes in support of expanding multicultural clinical competencies.

  • Multicultural values in psychotherapy and counseling are explored. The class focuses on exploring individual experiences of cultural identity through art responses and class discussion, and a developing a skill set that integrates cultural awareness into the clinical work. Experiences of race, ethnicity, class, spirituality, sexual orientation, gender and disability are included.

  • Field work in Mexico.

  • An integrated exploration of family art therapy within the context of family therapy theory. Experiential learning is facilitated through the art process.

  • Advanced studies in marital and family therapy including the exploration of a range of verbal and nonverbal treatment interventions and strategies from a variety of theoretical viewpoints. The class develops an understanding of the experiences of clients and family members of clients who are consumers of mental health services.

  • Psychopathology as stated in DSM IV is reviewed. The biological, psychological, social and cultural factors involved in etiology are discussed and explored in terms of the treatment/clinical interventions.

  • This course offers an overview of the neuroscience and pharmacological treatment of psychiatric disorders. It helps the student acquire necessary vocabulary, knowledge and skills for effective collaboration with the mental health treatment team.

  • Review of formal and informal psychological tests used for assessment, including issues of reliability, validity and item content. Projective drawings and structured clinical interviews are covered. Multicultural considerations in testing are integrated in all discussions.

  • This course strives to address the specific treatment needs and goals of the aging client. Topics include: distinguishing "normal" aging changes in intellectual, cognitive and memory functioning from those which are a consequence of disease; introduction to the bio-psychosocial model of assessment and psychotherapeutic treatment of older adults; and issues involved when working with the elderly and their families when they confront long-term care. The opportunity to challenge assumptions regarding one’s own aging and a look at issues which may impact future life plans will be provided.

  • This course introduces key definitions and constructs related to trauma. It introduces theories and intervention models and overviews neurological sequences associated with trauma.

  • The observation component of MFTH 608 - Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy.

  • An introduction to research design, ethics, and philosophy from a variety of research paradigms and approaches.

  • Overview of issues in law and ethics for marriage and family therapists and clinical art therapists, such as licensure, values, legal and ethical responsibilities, malpractice, and confidentiality.  Also discussed is the development of professional identity.

  • An overview of research design, ethics, and philosophy from a variety of research paradigms and approaches. Critical study of the relevant literature and the development of an in-depth proposal for a research/clinical project or paper to be carried out in the following semester.

  • The student carries out a research project and writes a research report under the direction of a faculty member. Requires consent of instructor.